Latest News | I’ve witnessed baby rhinos being butchered – why poachers and ‘trophy hunters’ like Ollie Williams m

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Videos can use content-based copyright law contains reasonable use Fair Use (). GUNFIRE shattered the silence as the rifle-toting poachers stormed the wildlife reserve, shot dead six rhinos and brutally hacked off their horns with axes.   They then vanished under the cloak of darkness, planning to sell the bloodied horns for up to £12,000 a kilogram to ‘cure’ the rich of common colds and to help them get erections.  By the time park rangers descended on the nightmarish scene, the vultures were already feasting. The rhinos lay in crimson pools of congealing blood, their once-magnificent faces mutilated.  The massacre, in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, was truly horrific – yet it’s just one of countless crimes against the world’s most endangered creatures in the £164 billion poaching trade. Bloodthirsty Brits paying thousands to kill wildlife  While poachers are savagely dehorning rhinos for cash, trophy hunters from Britain and elsewhere are paying thousands to gun down animals so they can pose for disgusting selfies.  Just last week, Love Island contestant Ollie Williams was outed as a big game hunter by The Sun, with pictures showing him smiling with the corpses of animals he’d killed in Africa.  It’s since emerged he has stepped down from the show.  And helpless animals aren’t the only victims. More than 1,000 rangers have given their lives on the front line in Africa while trying to protect endangered wildlife from humans. Shot antelope ‘cried like a human baby’  I’m a frontline conservationist, but growing up in the outback in South Africa, hunting was wired into my DNA. However, my love for animals soon killed my love of hunting stone dead.  When I was in my mid-teens, I shot and wounded an antelope. It was bleating like a child, so I rushed up to it, planning to put it quickly out of its misery with my pocket knife.  I thought one stab would end it all – but I was horribly wrong. As I hacked away at the artery behind its horns, which pumped blood to its brain, it cried like a human baby.  After that, I knew without doubt that I wanted to conserve nature rather than destroy it.  I never hunted again.  In the late 1990s, myself, my dad Bill and my brother William, a vet, transformed our 2,200-hectare family farm into a wildlife reserve, which would eventually be visited by Prince Harry.  Our first animals were a couple of giraffes, 12 zebras and a herd of antelope.  Then in 2003, after our neighbours came onboard and joined their properties with ours to make Amakhala Game Reserve, we got our first elephants from a reserve in KwaZulu-Natal. Elephants’ beautiful graveside tribute  The herd behaved beautifully and were content under our protection. And later, when an elephant who had arrived from elsewhere sadly died, we witnessed something amazing.  The herd dug the carcass up, carrying of

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